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Singer-songwriter and HUF ambassador Hanni El Khatib recently released a new EP, titled Savage Times Vol. 2. In support of the delivery, Khatib also dropped off the official aesthetic for project cut,Nike Air Vapormax flyknit review 2017 release date UK “Mangos & Rice.” This isn’t just any ol’ music video, however. The clip features vintage skate footage from the ’80s and early ’90s, showcasing HUF’s own Keith Hufnagel, as well as some of the greats including Keenan Milton, Gino Iannucci, Jon Buscemi and more shredding throughout NY during that time period. Hanni, a past HUF creative director, and Keith dug through two shoeboxes filled with old Hi8, VHS, Super8 and Mini DV tapes in order to compile the footage for the video. Press play above to check it out and be sure to snag a copy of Savage Times Vol. 2. HUF also recently joined with FTP for their first-ever collaboration.

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Highsnobiety’s longtime Supreme expert, Ross Wilson,Nike News Nike Vapormax for COMME des GAR ONS looks back to when he first came across the brand in the early ’90s and shares old stories with the shop’s OG manager, Alex Corporan. If you were brave enough to venture out to the opening day of Supreme’s Spring/Summer 2017 collection at one of their stores in NYC, LA, London or Paris, you would have witnessed the now-standard pandemonium that accompanies any major release. Now that Supreme has banned camping outside its stores, the early-morning rush sees chaotic scenes involving a mix of several hundred high school kids, streetwear collectors, skaters, tourists, journalists and inevitable resellers crowding the surrounding streets. Such scenes are now a regular, almost weekly, occurrence nowadays, but when I started hanging out at Supreme, back in the ‘90s, it was a very different story. Long before the round-the-block lines, the security guards, the crowd control barriers, the ticketing system, release dates and even the LA, London and Paris stores, Supreme was just a little skate store on a semi-abandoned block in downtown Manhattan. from the book Supreme, published by Rizzoli With all the focus on the sunshine state of California, skateboarding on the East Coast was as alternative as it got during the ’90s. New York’s seasonal bad weather, rough terrain, lack of skateparks, unforgiving traffic and overpopulated sidewalks made for a truly underground outlaw culture with skate rats hitting up the Brooklyn Banks by day and the old Ziegfeld Theatre by night. Pretty much halfway between these two skate spots — and a short push from Astor Place — was an unassuming block between Houston and Prince Street, tucked behind the main shopping strip of Broadway. Before Supreme opened in April 1994, Keith Haring’s “Pop Shop” was the only retail store on Lafayette Street, and most of the neighboring units remained empty — giving the street a quiet, neglected feel. It was an ideal skate spot. Much like it went on to do a decade later with their Fairfax store in LA, Supreme helped build a retail community surrounding its little shop on Lafayette. Stackhouse, X-Large, Clientele, Flight Club, Triple Five Soul, Brooklyn Industries, Diamond Supply Co, G Star, American Apparel and WeSC have all opened (and sometimes closed) doors on the short stretch of this Soho street, now making it a major destination for shoppers. The first time I visited New York back in October 1994, I had never heard of Supreme. I didn’t know anyone out there at the time, there was no official website, no streetwear blogs and no social media. I was skating round the city looking for a skate store, but that was harder than I expected — the skateboard industry was in a bit of a slump and unfortunately a lot of independent skate shops folded during this period. I found a tiny skate department in Paragon Sports on Union Square, and the chain store Blades on Broadway, but no actual skate shops. Pushing around some Soho side streets, I stopped off for a slice at Ray’s Pizza on Prince St, where some dude told me about a new store that had just opened right around the corner. Rolling up to the front window seeing a bank of TVs playing skate videos of the time from H-Street, 101, Girl, and Stereo, I knew this was exactly the kind of place I had been searching for. David Perez Shadi Firstly, the music hit you even before you even walked through the door — it was loud, seriously fucking loud! Slayer, Big L, Wu-Tang, Bowie, Sabbath, Bad Brains, Public Enemy — whatever was being played, it would always be at ear-splitting volume. I’ve been DJing in clubs for two decades, so I’m used to loud music, but in this confined space during the daytime it really smacked you right in the face! Stepping inside, the store was well-lit with bright white walls and a really high ceiling — the complete opposite to the little dark skate shops I was used to back home in the UK. The store’s clean surroundings and impeccably displayed products presented itself more like a high-end fashion boutique, and the Nag Champa incense burning near the front mixed with the faint aroma of weed, coming from the little room behind the cash register, gave the place a distinct odor. There was a wall of decks at the back of the store, to the right of a glass counter cabinet of skate hardware, and clothing from skate brands like Zoo York, Shorty’s, Independent and Spitfire on the heavy industrial rails. The shelving unit closest to the counter had a neat display of the store’s own tees and sweatshirts. Most skate brands were covered in huge garish, colorful designs, so the simple white logo in a red box placed on the chest of these garments made a stylish contrast. Having hung out in the store for most of that afternoon watching videos, and chatting to the staff about the UK skate scene, I decided to show some support and bought a couple of the shop’s tees for around $18 each. I originally wanted the Box Logo crewneck sweat but they were out of my size and those things were massive back then — it was the ’90s after all! Zoo York's Robbie Gangemi hanging out in the back The best thing about independent skateboard shops is that they aren’t just a place to go shopping — they’re a hangout, a meeting spot and the epicenter of the local skate scene. Supreme took this vibe and rolled it to the fullest — there weren’t really many customers, just skaters hanging out, talking trash, smoking, drinking and skating. Before people were using social media to see what their friends were up to, they had to actually meet in person, and this little shop on Lafayette Street quickly became the clubhouse for every skate rat in downtown NYC. It could be intimidating to outsiders, but that’s just how they liked it. For the following 15 years I became a bit of a part-time New Yorker, with regular bi-monthly visits for work, and Supreme would always be a familiar spot. Summer evenings were the best — video premiers on the sidewalk, skating Union Square and Astor Place, then hitting up the L.E.S dive bars like Max Fish, Lit Lounge and Motor City. I met some fascinating characters and made some great friends from that time, and it all centered around that scene. My good friend Alex Corporan was one of the store managers at Supreme from 1996-2005 and, on a recent trip back to NYC, I caught up with him to get his side of the shop’s story…. For further Supreme history, check out their 50 best accessories over the years. Alex Corporan How was the skate scene in downtown NYC back in the early-mid 90s? The NY skate scene was stylish, fun and high energy. It was a tight-knit community that hadn’t yet been exploited. Skate parks in the city weren’t even close to being a thing, so the streets were all we had — we were like a wolf pack hitting the asphalt from morning to late night. What was your first experience with the Supreme store? My boy Chappy was working at Union, James Jebbia’s first store, in 1993, and we met up at the ASR trade show in San Diego that summer. He was excited that their new shop was about to open and asked me to be part of it. I was super stoked because skate shops in NYC were a rarity at that time. The Supreme store was live in ’94 and it was perfect timing, because Zoo York had launched the previous year. All the NY crew were all back together again, including all the amigos up and down the East Coast. I actually ended up working there late 1996, I believe. One of many photos of the OG @supremenewyork squad #ifyoudontknownowyouknow @fvckdeadline @akiramowatt @peterbici @santomondongo, Aron, Paul Leung, Jake Walls, Giovanni Estevez, Manny @vmagazine shoot by

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Belgian designer Dries Van Noten presents several wallets from his well-received Spring/Summer 2014 collection. Carrying the collection’s detailed floral theme,Womens Nike VaporMax 1 VT Run Like UK the wallets feature card and bill pouches internally, with leather detailing used throughout for good measure. Take a look at both pieces above and pick up your favorite now from SOTO Berlin. Photography: Ryan Hursh for Highsnobiety.com

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